Tag Archives: Intellectual Property

How To Fight Your Domain Name Disputes. And Win!!

How To Fight Your Domain Name Disputes. And Win!!

How To Fight Your Domain Name Disputes. And Win!!Facebook and Instagram successfully recovered more than 100 domain names recently from a business that was selling Facebook and Instagram ‘likes’ and ‘followers’.

Social Marketing Madness had registered domain names that included the words Facebook or Instagram along with generic terms like ‘buy cheap likes’.

Facebook brought the complaint before the World Intellectual Property Office’s Arbitration and Mediation Center. WIPO determined that the domains were registered in bad faith, because the domains were being used for commercial gain and there was no other possible reason for their existence than to mislead consumers and take unfair advantage of the goodwill of the marks.

What to do if someone has a domain name incorporating your brand name?

If you discover that someone has registered a domain name incorporating your brand name, you might want to recover the domain. It’s worth noting that if you have a distinctive name that you have registered as a trademark, it will be a lot less costly and much simpler to recover the domains than if you’re relying on unregistered rights. (The below video explains how to choose a name that can function as a trademark)

 

The starting point is to decide whether to use the court system by litigating in the courts or  whether to initiate the dispute-resolution procedure available for the particular domain suffix. Each domain has its own dispute resolution procedure. The Uniform Domain-Name Dispute-Resolution Policy (UDRP) – which for .co.uk domains is Nominet – allows the person claiming rights in a name to apply under the relevant Domain Registrant Scheme, for domains registered in ‘bad faith’ to be transferred or cancelled.

Two of the benefits of arbitration over litigation are that it is generally cheaper and faster. The fees for filing a dispute-resolution claim are lower and you will not need to go to the expense of legal proceedings.

However, the main limitation of using the dispute-resolution scheme is that if you are successful, you can only expect to get the domain name transferred to you. The tribunal does not have the power to award any monetary damages.

One of the benefits of litigation over dispute-resolution is that there are a large number of remedies available, including damages. It’s also possible to get an undertaking from the squatter not to register any names in the future that infringe on your trade mark rights. Additionally, cybersquatters often have to pay your legal fees too in addition to transferring the domains. A few years ago Microsoft took legal action against cyber squatters in the USA, UK and other EU countries, to recover its domains and claim damages.

How to win a domain name dispute?

To win in this type of dispute you will need to prove three elements, namely that:

  • you have prior rights in the name;
  • the owner does not have rights in the name; and
  • the domain name was registered and is being used in bad faith.

To initiate an action, start by collecting evidence. Are there references on the website to you or to your competitors? Check the whois facility to find out who owns the domain name.

Check the date when the domain was registered to the current owner. If they registered the domain name after you began your business, or registered your trademark the case is much easier to prove.

Once you file a dispute-resolution procedure or initiate court proceedings, the domain is locked so that cyberflight (whereby the registrant transfers the domain to a third party) is no longer a serious risk.

As mentioned, to succeed in a domain dispute, it helps to have a trademark registration. This can make short work of the requirement to demonstrate rights in the name. Otherwise, you will need to establish that you have goodwill in the name.

If the domain name you are using for your brand is purely descriptive, there is little you can do to stop others using a similar domain name.

The message to take on board is that having a distinctive name which is protected by a trademark is an absolute essential in the digital economy. If a name isn’t descriptive, and is legally available, it means you can protect it and have exclusive rights over it. This makes it easier to have a unique online brand because if others are “passing off” your brand by registering your name as a domain, you are in a strong position to recover it from them

You don’t have to be a well known mark to be able to take action in the way Facebook has recently done.

What is a trademark and how to register yours correctly

 

What is a trademark and how to register yours correctlyWhat are trademarks?

Trade marks identify your products and services so that customers may find the products and services they like and avoid those they didn’t enjoy. If consumers have had a good experience with a business, or have heard that a particular business provides effective service, they may want to buy from that business. They should be able to reliably do so, without the risk of finding an imposter instead. Trademarks serve this purpose as they are your business’ “badge of origin”.

Signs and other identifiers

The signs that are typically registered are words (that is, names or slogans), and logos. Packaging and design features of a brand, including graphic symbols, are also sometimes registered.

There are other identifiers that are less commonly registered, such as musical jingles, shapes, colors, and smells. A well-known trademark registration of a shape is the Coca-Cola bottle. This is no simple feat to achieve as a registration. However, now that Coca Cola have managed to secure a trademark for this bottle shape, they have exclusive rights over the iconic bottle for as long as they continue to use it.

A registered trademark secures rights over not just the same name, logo, tagline or other sign, but also over confusingly similar ones too.  That’s because the aim behind them is to ensure that buyers can find the products or services they are looking for, and won’t be confused by competing products or services that are branded in a similar way.  So, a registered trademark owner is able to challenge others who use similar branding.

For example, just recently we heard that Darryl McDaniels, a member of influential hip hop group Run-DMC, has filed a £40.7 million lawsuit against Amazon, Walmart and other stores for using the  Run-DMC name and logo on clothing they sell. As McDaniel has the name and logo registered, and this makes it easier for him to enforce his rights and prevent competitors from benefiting from his trademark’s reputation. Similarly, McDonald’s was able to prevent the registration for foods or beverages, of trade marks combining the prefix ‘Mac’ or ‘Mc’ with the name of a food stuff or beverage.

Registering trademarks is therefore an essential step to retaining your brand’s distinctiveness, and securing the exclusive rights your business needs over elements of your brand identity.

How to register your trademark correctly

The starting point is to make sure you may legitimately lay claim to the name, tagline or logo you intend to use (or continue to use) and register.

The name of your product or service is the most important right to secure. Under trademark law names may be shared, which means you need to focus on choosing the business categories in which to register your mark. Trademarks are registered by reference to specific ‘classes’ or business categories. This means that if your desired name is already registered but for different business activities, you may still register it, and co-exist with another business who is using the same name for those different purposes.

For example, Automobile Association and American Airlines are both known as AA; similarly POLO is registered by three different businesses who use the name for a car, confectionery, and a line of clothing.

 

So, when you want to put your stake in the ground by claiming the rights to the elements of your identity, such as your name, logo, or strapline, you should be clear about how you’re going to develop your business. Then you can ensure you secure an adequate scope of protection in your  trademark registration. Otherwise, someone else may have rights to use the same or a similar brand element in the business categories you later realise you need. An example may help here. Say you register your name to sell clothing, and then later decide to also sell cosmetics. If someone else is using a similar name to yours for cosmetics, you would infringe on their rights, meaning you’d need to find a different name for your cosmetics. So, don’t ever assume you may just go ahead and use your name for any business activity. First check whether you’ve registered the name for that business category – cosmetics, in this example, and if not, do a search and register in the new business category before embarking on the new use of your name.

Advantages of registering a trademark

The advantages of registering a trademark are significant. Registration considerably reduces the risk of others picking the same brand element for their new products or services because your registration is on the public trademark registers. People are expected to search these registers before choosing names or other brand elements. If you’re not on the register someone else may build rights over the same name or other brand element, and this can lead to messy disputes and unnecessary costs.

Another aspect of registering your trademark properly is to register in other countries in which you do business given that trademarks are territorial. This means your registration only protects you in the UK (or EU, if you’ve registered an EU mark).

A UK trademark registration covers the UK only while an EU trademark registration currently covers all 28 European Union countries in a single application, including the UK.  However, once Brexit kicks in and we leave the EU, this will no longer be the case, and you should be considering your strategy carefully if you’re registering your mark now.

To protect your mark in other countries, it is possible to use your trademark registration in the UK or EU as the basis of wider applications in other countries, either under the Madrid Protocol or directly with an agent if your desired country isn’t party to the Madrid Protocol.

You don’t need to be a household name, or a huge multinational to aspire to be a brand in the sense of becoming a recognised provider of the products and service you sell. Your brand protection is  important.

Azrights IP One – Intellectual Property Made Easy

 

image_ipone_product_launch

There is no one size fits all when it comes to the actions you need to take to secure your IP. Protecting IP might involve doing some due diligence searches, registering rights, using appropriate documentation, and more. Your IP protection strategy will depend on your business plans, and overall objectives. For example, a business with a product like C-Pen will need patent advice, among other things. On the other hand, an author setting out to write a book, such as JK Rowling of Harry Potter fame,  What JK Rowling Needed to Know About Intellectual Property will need advice on copyright primarily. Both might want advice on trademarks too.

IPOne

So, we’ve introduced a new service: IPOne to offer SMEs the strategic IP advice they need regardless of their business or IP profile. The prices are fixed. We’re working on a tech version of this, which when launched, will give start ups on a shoe string budget access to the IP advice they need before they start up. This will be released later in 2017.

Why we created the IPOne service

We created the IPOne service because clients sometimes asked us for a comprehensive review of their IP position, and we had no specific service offering with clear deliverables to propose to them. Another reason we created the IPOne was that occasionally we noticed businesses that seemed to be focusing their IP expenditure on the wrong IP protection. For example, in one  case, an SME with a successful operation in the EU and USA, with no trademark protection in place at all, decided to  spend a considerable amount of money on filing a US patent for a business process that was unlikely to result in a strong patent, if it succeeded at all. With proper advice this business would have known to get some trademark protection, strategically maximising its budget.

Another reason we introduced the service was when we noticed how many SMEs were registering a trademark without first commissioning any searches, or  using IP without doing due diligence checks.

The problem

Invariably our most popular service is trademark registration. Trademarks have, to some extent, become a commoditized service due to the large number of service providers, many of them unqualified, who offer low cost trademark services. Businesses are even encouraged to believe  trademarks are simple enough for them to draft themselves.

As a law firm we were conscious of the risks clients faced in requesting a single service like trademark registration, when they had a host of other IP issues they were not even aware of. Yet the going rate for trademark registration was insufficient to allow scope for incidental advice on other IP rights.

Whenever it was clear that a client needed to take wider advice, we would highlight this to them. However, as the IP needs of businesses vary so much depending on the business model, IP advice doesn’t lend itself to being addressed in passing. It’s necessary to understand the client’s business model and aspirations in order to give relevant advice.

Intellectual Property also often involves a large element of education. So, it’s time consuming to communicate IP issues to SMEs, and advise on how they should structure their processes to be protected on an ongoing basis. The other problem we had is how to offer a price so clients would know in advance how much they would need to pay for holistic IP advice regardless of whether their business model would require a focus on patents, trademarks, designs, copyright, trade secrets, or database rights.  Giving an hourly rate and estimating the number of hours involved to advise isn’t straightforward to do when you don’t yet know enough about the client’s business model.

Who’s it for?

The IPOne service is for small businesses of fewer than 10 staff, be they pre-start up, early stage, or established. Every business that is aiming to build value or who simply wants to avoid some of the unpleasant consequences that can befall the unwary if they infringe on the rights of third parties, needs the IPOne.

When you have a good idea for a product or service, what you’re doing when you bring it to life is that you’re creating intellectual property. Virtually every decision you make in the early days of a project, from choosing a name, having a website or logo designed for you, writing content, creating a data plan, or taking some other creative action, has IP implications.

If you wait till you’re successful before taking IP advice it can be too late. IP needs to be taken account of early on if you want to avoid the need to undo ill considered actions later on. By then you might have already built something successful, and if its foundations are shaky it could have very serious consequences for you. So if you want to wait to address IP issues till your business has taken off, then consider whether it is possible to make all your decisions temporary ones? If not, it could be too late to leave IP advice till your concept is proven. Prevention really is ten times cheaper than a cure.

What’s different about the IPOne service?

The IPOne service is a fixed price service to give you holistic IP advice. It includes deliverables that SMEs invariably need, such as legal agreements, and a letter of advice, as well as a one to one consultation to ensure you take steps that are appropriate to your unique business requirements. A few key actions will set you up with strong foundations, giving you 80 per cent of the protection you need, short of registering your IP rights. All our IPOne services include advice on the steps to take in order to obtain this wide ranging IP protection on an ongoing basis.

What will clients get at the end of it?  

After you’ve had advice and holistic IP guidance your business can proceed to determine its strategy for securing its IP. Some SMEs may be better placed to obtain a legal monopoly, create new income streams or otherwise use IP to grow profit margins and protect their market share. You will be more able to protect the effort you put into building your business by knowing how to prevent competitors from copying you in damaging ways.

What Next?

The IPOne service responds to a market need for tailored IP advice giving a holistic view on the IP issues pertinent to any small business.

We want to change the way business protects its IP so SMEs are properly aware of the implications of their decisions when implementing their ideas, and know what to do on an ongoing basis to be protected.

 For a free consultation on how we can help your business 

What JK Rowling Needed To Know About Intellectual Property law

J K Rowling and Intellectual PropertyJK Rowling is now a successful writer with one of the most valuable brands. It’s taken her just 21 years to get there. Initially, when she sent her first manuscript to publishers, she was turned down by more than 12 of them before Bloomsbury, a publishing house in London, accepted her book.

Authors starting out will rarely have an agent to look after their interests.  So it’s important in those early days, for a writer to take advice on the publishing agreement before signing it. It’s the same with any project involving IP – it’s vital to get IP advice before implementing your ideas.

Why a publishing agreement is so critical 

Certainly, JK Rowling’s considerable wealth didn’t result from book sales alone. However, the foundations for that wealth began with her first publishing agreement which is a critical contract.

The publishing agreement determines how the intellectual property arising may be exploited. The rights you give your publisher set out who may control the various rights in the work you create.

As the creator of the work, the writer will own the copyright in it. Therefore, the agreement should protect your copyright, and you should never give it away to the publisher. So, if your publishing agreement has a copyright assignment clause in favour of the publisher, don’t sign it before taking advice.

Most publishers will let authors keep the copyright, and will insist on having certain rights, such as the exclusive right to print, or to produce translations, licensed to them. Other rights like film, or television rights might well be left entirely to the author, while it will depend on the type of book and the publisher what happens to book club rights or similar.

At the time JK Rowling secured her first publishing deal, who could have known her books would have so much success? Yet if you are someone creating a business, or an artistic work, or piece of music, you need to assume you will be hugely successful, and not give away your rights unthinkingly.

Ownership of copyright underlies JK Rowlng’s wealth

If JK Rowling had assigned her copyright in Harry Potter to the publisher, she would not have achieved the profits and wealth that her writing gave rise to. It’s because she retained ownership of copyright that she was able to licence others to use the name on merchandise, to license the making of films, and to carve out rights to licensees of her work on a geographic basis.

Harry Potter has been registered as a trademark as have other characters, along with many designs produced around the books’ elements. Securing such IP rights or giving others the right to do so plays a crucial role in the income generated by the brand.

Once you own IP rights which are desirable to others to use, you may license a whole host of businesses in exchange for royalties. Licensing increases your  revenues for as long as there is a market for your creations. And unlike physical property there is no natural limit to the number of people to whom you can give a right to use your IP. So the revenues to be earned from IP far exceed what you would be able to earn from investment in physical property like land which may only be let out to one party at a time.

Consequently JK Rowling’s creations have been used on a variety of goods and services. The movie characters have been licensed to theme parks and other organisations, and reproduced on many different merchandise. Licensing agreements are flexible as they allow you to license as much or as little of your IP as you like.  JK Rowling’s creations have made billion dollar profits as a result.

Conclusion

In conclusion, Rowling’s considerable wealth today is all down to her intellectual property, with her biggest source of income being generated from licensing.

So the moral is to protect your IP if you have ideas to bring to the world. Whether you are an author, designer, software developer, or entrepreneur, don’t ignore IP whatever you’re creating. By taking timely advice and setting your IP strategy you will be better placed to secure essential IP assets and build your business on strong foundations. The future growth of any business is based on its IP.

Why not begin by attending my next workshop by following the link on the sidebar of this blog.

 

What is Intellectual Property and Why Does it Matter to You?

What is Intellectual Property and Why Does it Matter to You?Every business will have intellectual property to protect, although the actions to take will be very different depending on the business and the intellectual property involved.

Say you’ve invented some innovative way to solve a problem that no one else has managed to solve. In the case of Anywayup cup it was a baby cup with an innovative lid that didn’t spill. For C-Pen it was a pen that scans the text of a document directly to your computer. A patent is available in both these situations to protect your investment.  Arguably, for product-based inventions a patent is essential because it gives you a legal monopoly in the invention. The patent, if well drafted, makes it difficult for others to copy your invention. Without patent protection well-resourced manufacturers could enter the same market once they realise you are onto something, and use their greater financial muscle to produce and publicise a similar offering.

Then suppose you have selected the perfect name for your invention and had a logo developed for it with an attractive design. How would you feel if you were to find out after spending time and resources promoting the name, that it couldn’t be exclusive to you because the name is incapable of functioning as a trademark? This is what happened to Tesco’s Clubcard. The name it chose for its loyalty program has proved impossible to protect. If this was you, wouldn’t you prefer to know about it in advance, so you could make a better choice? Or, say you find that the name is not legally available and you then lose everything overnight when a trade mark owner is able to put a stop to your continued use of your name? This is what happened to Scrabulous whose business on Facebook went up in a puff of smoke. And did you know that if you don’t take the right actions in relation to your logo, you could find yourself on the wrong end of a dispute as happened to Innocent who at one point lost the right to use their iconic logo. Would you have the resources to appeal such a decision as they did? These are just some examples of what can happen when you don’t get timely IP advice.

Every business has IP issues to consider because every business has a name, a logo, a website, a database of contacts and more. These are all intangible assets which are important to the success of a business.

What is IP?

IP is the collective name for the rights that protect creativity, imagination and ideas. It’s very wide ranging and the rules are often complex.

Trademarks identify your products or services, secure exclusive rights over the name of your business and contain the value of your brand. With the right name you can stop competitors stealing business away from you. Copyright is another essential intellectual property right. Every business uses copyright works because every business is likely to have a logo, website, brochures, photographs, packaging, software etc. Design protection is another type of IP right which is often overlooked. However, it is a powerful tool for protecting your market share and preventing competitors from copying your ideas.

 

 

The Benefits of Protecting Your Intellectual Property

Strategic decisions about IP should be made early in the business so as to make good choices of IP, and determine how best to protect yourself with your available resources.

IP presents both risks and opportunities. Used wisely, IP advice and protection

  • increases the value of your business,
  • helps grow your profit margins,
  • creates income streams,
  • attracts finance,
  • protects your market share,
  • prevents competitors from copying your ideas,
  • reduces future risks and liability (including personal liability of directors),
  • protects the effort you put into your business, and
  • gives you a legal monopoly.

Common IP Mistakes

A common mistake is to assume that IP advice is just needed if a business has a potential patent or trade mark to register. In the digital economy IP support is needed for every business.

Another error we often see, is businesses simply registering their trademark without doing any due diligence searches. It’s important to note that a trademark registration can be cancelled if someone else has better rights to the name. This is what happened to Microsoft who had registered Skydrive as a trademark only to have its use of the name challenged. Rebranding to Onedrive cost millions. Not every business has the resources of Microsoft to shoulder the costs that a rebrand invariably involves.

Some business owners justify ignoring IP on the grounds that they don’t have the resources to litigate. They wonder what is the point of protecting their IP. You’re actually much more likely to get into a dispute if you don’t register your rights than if you do. Owning registered IP rights can be a very useful bargaining tool if you find yourself threatened by a competitor. Unfortunately disputes relating to intellectual property may arise when your business has taken off and your IP has acquired value. Not protecting it could lay yourself wide open. So don’t expose yourself to litigation by not taking some basic steps to protect yourself.

How To Protect Your Intellectual Property?

IP help is important when you’re deciding how to implement your idea because the choices you make when bringing your ideas to life are all IP decisions. By consulting an IP lawyer at that early stage you are much better placed to make effective choices, and reduce the likelihood of having to undo ill considered decisions later on.Taking a holistic approach to IP is crucial.

We are well placed to help you to take control of your intellectual property so your business can flourish from a secure foundation. Do get in touch for a no obligation confidential discussion.

For a free consultation on how we can help your business 

How You Can Increase the Value of Your Business Without Increasing Turnover!

Whatever stage your business is at – and particularly if you are at a growth stage or thinking about exit – you will be looking to add value to your business and to promote its success. Contrary to popular belief, the traditional method of valuing a business used by accountants, namely earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortisation – EBITDA – with its focus on increasing revenues, is not necessarily the yardstick by which your business will be valued.

In reality, there is no single formula to valuing a company on exit that can be used to precisely value every private business. The seller will want to drive the price up, and potential buyers will want the opposite. Although there are relatively easy ways to value certain parts of the business – such as stock, fixed assets (land, machinery, equipment etc.), there will very probably be a sizeable intangible element to the value of a business.

Intangible elements would include “goodwill” – this could comprise trademarks, and the reputation of the company, and other intellectual property. Such assets are notoriously difficult to value, and in many cases will come down to how keen a potential buyer is to acquire your business. If there is a strategic fit, a buyer might pay a significant premium to acquire your business. So, it’s worth planning your exit strategy carefully, and starting with some advice on IP would be a good idea.

Examples Of A Good IP Strategy

Instagram is an example of a company which was acquired for a sum well beyond its “market value” at the time. Facebook reportedly acquired Instagram in April 2012 for $1 billion because Instagram already had a built-in user base, which Facebook’s own planned photo sharing app lacked. By purchasing Instagram, Facebook acquired a foothold in the photo sharing market, and at the same time squashed a threat to its own dominance in photo sharing. Essentially, the valuation was based on Instagram’s intangible assets, namely goodwill and intellectual property, and its strategic fit for Facebook.

Similarly, Facebook’s acquisition of Whatsapp for $21.8 billion was largely driven by the large user base WhatsApp enjoyed. The purchase price achieved was also a high one as Facebook was competing with Google to purchase the company.

These examples demonstrate that synergies within businesses can result in a valuation which is far higher than the company turnover or traditional methods of valuation might suggest. There is an element of the qualitative, rather than the quantitative, when assessing a company’s sale prospects, and if there is a competitive bid (as in the Whatsapp scenario) this tends to push the valuation even higher.

Strategic protection of your intellectual property and goodwill is fundamentally important whatever the basis of the valuation.  It is best to secure your IP protection sooner rather than later, as IP is foundational. It can make the difference between a successful sale and a potential buyer or investor walking away. Here is a video which explains more about IP.

Your IP Real Estate

Maybe you are a local business serving a loyal customer base, or you are not in the technology space but rather selling goods and services. Whilst the above examples of a strong valuation, not based on turnover, involve technology companies, most companies now interface with technology at some point.  We are living at a time when any company, even your small business, could learn from these examples, and be savvy about how to increase its value.

At the very least you will have a website to promote your business and all businesses increasingly have an online dimension. Many businesses become successful by offering an effective way of enabling consumers to buy from them online. For example, Victoria Plum made bathrooms available to order on the web, and in less than 15 years has built up a business worth millions.

Another example of how an effective online offering can lead to a huge valuation is Skyscanner, which is a global online metasearch engine that enables people to find comparisons for flights. It was founded in Scotland in 2001 by three IT professionals. Following various rounds of investment and expansion over the years, and with 50 million monthly users, it has recently been sold to Chinese travel giant Ctrip for £1.4 billion. A large portion of its valuation on exit will have been attributable to its intangible assets, namely its brand, goodwill and effective algorithms. That is why the website has become so successful.

As the web and technology become more important in our lives, it means intellectual property and technology law are inevitably critical areas on which modern businesses need advice, especially if they are aiming to succeed in some way using technology.

Use IP To Increase Your Valuation

So, if you are looking for ways to improve your business value, consider developing a product that meets your customers’ needs, rather than just focusing on increasing sales and other revenue generating activities.

We have fixed price IP services that can support your business and secure its intellectual property.

How to stay in control and avoid giving too much away during the pitch process

The Pitch Process – How Much Should You Reveal?

How to stay in control and avoid giving too much away during the pitch process

It can be difficult to know how much to reveal about your business during the pitch process. If you’re pitching in a public forum, should you risk giving your original ideas away? Is the exposure and possible investment funding worth the risks?
During the pitch process you are necessarily disclosing information about your business plans in order to impress a potential investor or client. The need to find the right balance between disclosure and secrecy is crucial for the protection of your intellectual property.

Seeking funding

In situations where a non-disclosure agreement (NDA) can be used, that might be a solution to the problem. However, in practice it’s unlikely that potential investors would be willing to sign NDAs. It’s more to your advantage that they hear what you have to say than it is to theirs to listen to you.

Statistically there are a lot more people looking for investment than there are investors. Moreover, while non-disclosure agreements (NDAs) protect you don’t take too much comfort from the mere signing of a confidentiality agreement.

Beware of others stealing your best ideas

If you have an idea which the other party could implement better than you – such as the situation that arose for the Winklevoss twins who shared their concept for Facebook with Mark Zuckerburg – then avoid going to them for investment if you have a potentially lucrative idea. Or if it is essential that you communicate the information to a third party without the benefit of an NDA in order to progress it, could you perhaps reveal the broad idea without going into too much detail?.

Another aspect that is worth considering is conducting a background search about the potential investor or client. Checking their reputation might provide useful ways to assess how much information is safe to reveal to them.

It’s important to be mindful of your business before divulging information. With some ideas you simply shouldn’t discuss them without an NDA if loss of confidentiality would lose you the opportunity to patent the concept. What if you have an idea for a product-based concept – such as Mandy Haberman’s Anywayup Cup? You would lose the opportunity to patent if you don’t use an NDA. Mandy Haberman could not have succeeded had she not patented the cup before going to market.

Patent pending applications

In practice, it is a mistake to go to an investor without having first applied for patent protection. Once you have a patent pending, you could proceed to raise funds. The costs associated with such first filing are not as high as you might assume.

The initial filing gives you 12 months’ protection worldwide, and an inventor who has intellectual property like a patent application, will be more attractive to a potential investor.

Names need protecting

Another issue to consider is protecting the name you want to use for new products and services you’ll be discussing while pitching in public. If you haven’t protected the name you are at risk. This is because names are not protected by copyright and a member of the audience could easily steal the idea, register the name as a trade mark and gain the benefit of all the publicity you generate.

Do take advice on names as there are many pitfalls for the unwary. If the name you are using is not legally effective, and suitable for your business, you might waste your resources in applying to register trade marks.

In conclusion, any ideas or names you have for a new business concept or product that you might want to divulge during a pitch are worth discussing with an IP lawyer before divulging them to others. Our IP One offering is the ideal way to access such advice, as the price starts from £490, and you get a lot more than advice. There is a search, templates, and videos too. Not a lot to protect the future value of your ideas, products and services.

Shireen will be discussing this topic on the panel at the 4th Drum Brief Encounters Conference on 20th of October. It’s at the Congress Centre in London. You can book at http://briefencounters.thedrum.com/.

How to stay in control and avoid giving too much away during the pitch process

Intellectual Property In The Digital Economy

shutterstock_63380170_jpg for the blogAs an IP lawyer, I am well aware of how little intellectual property is understood in entrepreneurship circles. Even MBA courses barely address the topic. Yet the digital economy has many implications on the relevance of Intellectual Property (IP) for business.

I did some quick research a while back and found that out of twenty top start-up business books released between 2006 and 2013 only eight even mentioned IP. It was a similar story when I looked at MBA courses. The one run at London Business School is ranked number four in the world according to the Financial Times. Yet it does not mention IP in its core modules.

In the UK alone there are more than half a million new companies registered every year. Yet many of these start-ups are completely unaware of what IP even means, some of which probably go under or achieve less success as a result.

Society hasn’t caught up with the dramatically changed role of IP law in the digital age.

A simple search on the web will instantly reveal whether a name or image you are using belongs to someone else. While in the industrial age you might have got away with infringing on other people’s IP because nobody was likely to find out about you, now that everything is out in the open, it is no longer possible to ignore copyright and trade mark issues, even if you are a small start-up.

However, it is not just because you could be infringing on somebody else’s rights that you need to take account of IP. In the overcrowded world of business, it is important to stand out with distinctive names, and to understand how to position yourself for commercial success.

You want to be able to scale your business through licensing or other commercialisation activities. These all depend on having secure IP rights, and understanding IP is essential to knowing how to protect your business against inevitable copying by competitors if you are successful.

So, avoiding infringing on others’ rights, and using IP rights to protect your unique business proposition are crucially relevant to any ambitious business both before it starts outs, and on an ongoing basis as the business progresses.

Regarding the IP help, it’s not enough to simply register rights. You also need appropriate agreements and advice so you are able to successfully commission the technology on which your business relies, and manage your risks. That involves focusing on the relationships you have in place with outsourcers, clients, partners and more.

For physical products, the internet is an important distribution channel, so SMEs need help to identify and protect their IP, and to understand the online space.

At Azrights we have developed solutions to help early stage businesses as well as more established ones to understand their IP needs.

It is important to me to raise awareness of IP so that the many businesses out there that have yet to receive help with their intellectual property can do so.

IP WORKSHOPS - ESSENTIAL IP LAW FOR CREATIVES

IP Workshops – Essential IP Law For Creatives

IP WORKSHOPS - ESSENTIAL IP LAW FOR CREATIVESI have been hosting focused intellectual property workshops for creative agencies for a few months now. Attendees are incredibly engaged, and invariably find aspects of the workshop a real eye opener.

Intellectual property is intrinsically bound up with the work creative agencies do. Therefore, a good knowledge of Intellectual property law helps in running a creative business, as well as reducing the risk of legal complications.

For example, better to avoid an infringement claim by doing proper due diligence checks before creating a logo than waiting to find out there is a problem once the logo is already created.

Liability for IP issues

While many agencies aim to limit their liability for IP related issues by putting the onus on the client to obtain legal advice themselves, it is difficult to see how agencies could successfully absolve themselves of liability in situations where they create a new logo, or even a new name.

One of the most memorable cases involved a dispute over the Dr Martens Airware logo . Due to a lack of IP knowledge the agency was embroiled in litigation along with the client, and suffered significant time, effort and expense in the ensuing court battle. This could have been so easily avoided with the right documentation in place.

IP law essential

The role of IP law is therefore crucial in avoiding pitfalls, and positioning clients of agencies for maximum success. IP fits hand-in-glove with the creative process.

The workshops highlights the pitfalls. Then by simply offering IP services, or referring matters to an IP specialist at the appropriate time in the creative cycle, agencies are able to give their clients real help while absolving themselves of responsibility.

Contrary to popular belief the right time to refer clients is not after the creative exercise is concluded. The appropriate due diligence checks should be carried out at an early stage, because if what you intend to create or use infringes on a third party’s rights, the client has nothing worth protecting. All the effort taken in creating the identity is wasted.

The workshops help agencies to find alternatives to simply asking their client to consult their own lawyers. Many clients will not have lawyers or may never consult any lawyers because they do not appreciate the significance of doing so. The upshot is that they are at risk of using an identity that may cause problems for them down the line. That will impact their revenues, and could expose them to litigation. And it’s doubtful that a clause excluding liability in the agency’s terms would be legally effective anyway.

The next workshop is on 14 July from 3-5pm. It’s a small session for a maximum of 8 people to attend.

This session costs £40+VAT per person (or £25+VAT for early birds) and includes refreshments, as well as a copy of my book Intellectual Property Revolution.

To book go to EVENTBRITE NOW.

Relief for IP lawyers at this year’s State Opening of Parliament

bridge 3This year’s State Opening of Parliament has provided IP lawyers with some relief. Amidst prison reforms and other new legislative measures, Intellectual Property was on the agenda as the Queen introduced the Intellectual Property (Unjustified Threats) Bill on 18th May 2016.

Following a review of the controversial law on groundless threats of legal action in cases that involve patents, trade marks and designs, the government has begun plans to agree proposals that will ensure lawyers are exempt from liability when making threats on behalf of their clients.

IP lawyers will welcome news that recommendations powered through by Law Society’s Intellectual Property Law Committee are to be adopted. The Bill aims to lower the current hurdles that businesses encounter when caught in IP disputes.

The current provisions allow the recipient of an infringement letter to claim against the rights holder, as well as their legal advisor in some circumstances. This can create difficulties for businesses seeking to enforce their rights and has a reputation amongst practitioners as being unworkable and unjust.

The Intellectual Property (Unjustified Threats) Bill will provide some direction when distinguishing between the levels of a supply chain. The Bill will ensure that rights holders focus their assertions on the source of the suspected infringement and away from IP lawyers.

A draft Bill was published last October, in response to a long and widely-debated campaign by the Law Society’s Intellectual Property Law committee. The draft Bill was considered as ‘suitable and uncontroversial’ and is eagerly awaited by Intellectual Property practitioners.

The Bill is set to become law in the coming year and should make it easier for businesses to settle disputes outside of the courtroom. The proof shall be in the pudding.

Read more about how Intellectual Property Law could affect your business, or contact a member of our team on +44 0 20 7700 1414.